Assignment 5 – thoughts and timeline

05 July

Well I have just finished discussing my recent assignments with my tutor, which I will discuss in another post once my written feedback has been received. The one thing that is clear is that while I can research a piece quite competently, I don’t communicate my thought processes enough to make this evident. Its something I need to address.

Soooo, I have been thinking over the  last few days what Id like to do for my final assignment for this unit. I’m thinking I would like to do something with landscapes that explores the counties of Yorkshire, perhaps coastal or country but something that explores my favourite mode of photography. So to that end I will start looking at practitioners of Landscape photography and I wont be surprised if Ansel Adams ends up in there somewhere. Having purchased “Ansel Adams 400 Photographs”, the work is breath taking and is certainly the hall mark of landscape photography.

Next steps research and location scouting….

I’m  thinking along the lines of some Landscape work to incorporate some of my favourite spots across Yorkshire

  • Lady Bower Reservoir
  • Canals that lie along our local area
  • Sprotbrough Falls
  • Aysgarth Falls
  • Whitby
  • Saltburn
  • Robin Hood Bay

It may change, I may not even use any of it, but it will be nice to get out and do some photography outdoors at last and I might even get to fly the drone this time, we’ll see, it would be nice though.

12 July

Well it has been a gruelling week of work, so haven’t had much time to do anything except read. I have been looking at the work of a British photographer Michael Kenna who along with Ansel Adams and Sebastiao Salgado seem to epitomise the type of photography I like to do at a standard I would love to attain albeit with my own voice. The images they produce speak volumes:

When I think of landscapes personally they conjure up memories of travel especially moving from place to place with my fathers work, the times I spent visiting relations on the south coast, the holidays I spend with friends and family involving a tent, caravan or cottage which extends from family vacations as a child. It also reminds me of my time working in the scouts, cadets and subsequently army reserves as well as the work I used to do in Youth services. All of it retains a memory of something good. This is surely where my love of landscape photography comes from. There is a peace associated with it, getting away from it all.

17 July

So the plan is to go for a walk on Sunday and retrace the route of a local cycle trail and see what comes to me. I have some ideas regarding water as a general theme, but don’t want to force it as I may find something that leads me elsewhere. In the meantime I will finish typing up my notes on exercise 5.3, which was  interesting as it is probably one of the first times I’ve really sat and explored a photograph, interesting…

19 July

Took a walk along our local canal to take some photos and I am reasonably happy with what I have come away with, in the meantime I will continue my research into Michael Kenna and David Brookover. There is not a lot of information on David Brookover, yet I do find his work quite interesting and he was quite enjoyable to listen to. I may do a separate piece on him or perhaps use it to discuss some of the developing techniques he talks about. In terms of the assignment I have chosen Michael Kenna, Franco Fontana and Sebastiao Salgado as my practitioners, 3 very different styles for the same subject matter.

This was one of the images I snapped today that probably will not make the final edit, but I liked the way it looked in this format and the layering between this bridge in the foreground, the trees and those big beautiful clouds in the distance.

24 July

Talk a trip further along the canal today as I wanted to get a few shots of the Aqueduct and I was very fortunate to snap a lovely barge crossing as I arrived. Next stop was Sprotbrough Falls to get some longer exposures and experiment a little with my pinhole lens (not for this assignment). Again fairly happy with the results, though I wont be sure until I do some post processing. Sunday I plan to take a trip to Lady Bower Reservoir, but it may change into a trip to Robin Hoods Bay, Saltburn and Whitby. I’m letting the wife decide on this one as we are taking our social bubble along with us.

25 July

Came across some You Tube videos named the artist series on “The Art of Photography” channel

26 July

I’m definitely feeling my age today, finishing the night shift for the week, home, shower and an hours kip before shooting off to the Lady Bower Reservoir. Its either a combination of the sleep deprived state I’m in and the drive and nightmare of trying to find a parking space, when it feels like half of the country has descended on the place. Lets just say I wasn’t feeling it and felt totally underwhelmed by my work, though it was nice to get out and enjoy the air and take in the surroundings. I imagine another time of year it may be a different story altogether. It almost feels like I am looking for something in the landscape I cannot quite put my finger on, though it feels better just getting out with the camera and even the smartphone one. I have managed some images, so well see how they turn out after post processing. On a side note, I finally got to use my camera backpack today and have to say it was quite comfortable, so It will remain packed and ready to grab and go now. Here are a few image grabs captured today:

I like the panoramic shots this phone can do and these two above I was very pleased with and as much as I am tempted, they will not be in the final set, I should try this on the camera at some stage. I also like the first image of the steps inside the overflow quite abstract.

27 July

Lots of research to type up, well lets see how much I actually get into the assignment this time. Its always concerning when I do this bit, because it can often feel way too pretentious in trying to render an opinion on someone who I consider to be an artisan or Master of their craft and use that to justify my approach to a brief with images by a photographer still searching for his voice. Does that make any sense? I’ve also asked for an extension to the assignment today and I don’t expect to get this one finished off until after the weekend. I have Friday booked as a holiday so that will give me time to reflect on the what I have done and plan for this weekends shoot. I’ve decided to get the assignment finished first before tackling the remainder of the tasks I have left to do before I am happy to mark this unit as complete.

29 July

Just finished going over the research for Franco Fontana, 3 landscape photographers each with very distinct approaches and very unique voices. I could sum up as an artist, a minimalist and a dramatist. Time to get ready for work and finalise my to do list for next week.

2 August

Wrapped up a lovely weekend of walking, taking in the sights of Robin Hoods Bay, Whitby and Conisbrough. I decided upon early morning for Whitby and Robin Hoods Bay as these places for one tend to get busy during the day. It would also give me a perfect chance to capture sunrise at Whitby, which to be fair turned out to be a little bit of a disappointment. Nevertheless I made the most of what we had to work with and captured  some nice shots in both places before heading home. I have added the ones that didn’t make the final cut to the end of the post. This reminds me of why I enjoy this mode of photography, I can just find something to shoot that interests me and go.

10 August

I have spent the last week selecting, editing and finalising the details on this assignment, including adding a PDF viewer to my site to make it easier to add and view contact sheets. I just hope it was all worthwhile and if not I enjoyed it anyway. The one thing I have noticed in reflecting on the images I take is that there are competing elements I look at beyond the landscape, it could single elements such as stones and rocks to the abstract. I have considered whether it would be worthwhile documenting this process for future reference.

 

References

irastehmann.com, Michael Kenna – Series. [online]. Available at: https://www.irastehmann.com/artists/37-michael-kenna/series/ [Accessed 9 July 2020]

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 11 July, 2020
  • Focal length: 70mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/6s
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Exercise 5.3: Looking at photography

The Brief

‘When somebody sees something and experiences it – that’s when art happens’ (Hans-Peter Feldman)

Hans-Peter Feldman: www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPPhiSgv5fw [accessed 25/01/18]

If photography is an event then looking at photography should also be an event. Look again at Henri Cartier-Bresson’s photograph Behind the Gare Saint-Lazare in Part Three. (If you can get to the Victoria & Albert Museum in London you can see an original print on permanent display in the Photography Gallery.) Is there a single element in the image that you could say is the pivotal ‘point’ to which the eye returns again and again? What information does this ‘point’ contain? Remember that a point is not a shape. It may be a place, or even a ‘discontinuity’ – a gap. The most important thing though is not to try to guess the ‘right answer’ but to make a creative response, to articulate your ‘personal voice’.

Include a short response to Behind the Gare Saint-Lazare in your learning log. You can be as imaginative as you like. In order to contextualise your discussion, you might want to include one or two of your own shots, and you may wish to refer to Rinko Kawauchi’s photograph mentioned above or the Theatres series by Hiroshi Sugimoto discussed in Part Three. Write about 300 words.

Response

So what is the image telling me? – On the face of it there appears to be a man leaping, though my first impression was running for some reason. It is evident that there is a body of water there, so leaping is the likely scenario. I cannot see where this man will end up, perhaps he will disappear like Dawn French in the Vicar of Dibley when she jumps into the puddle. Why has the man chosen this haphazard route, is he trying to make an escape or an ill thought out shortcut.

The standout element in this photograph, the thing that draws my eye every time I see this image is the gentleman leaping, captured at precisely the right moment before he makes contact with the water. The man appears to float . There is a symmetry between the gentleman and the water which creates a perfect reflection of the man as he leaps. The same assessment can be made of this image below, which was taken several years ago and shows the reflection of the railway bridge and land in the water creating a mirror image.

As I explore Bressons image further other elements come into view such as the reflection of the bank, the fence, the wall and posters that adorn it. There is also another man in the background along with a wheelbarrow. I consider these secondary elements but, as I explore the image further another element stands out. The poster on the wall shows a woman leaping, which creates a new striking juxtaposition between and the leaping man in the foreground. This element was not immediately noticeable by me and as such gives me a renewed appreciation for the image.

To the world at large at least as an art form and as a biographical piece this image is lauded as a great example of the decisive moment and it stands as a great example of photography that has often been eluded to in print and copied by other artists and enthusiasts over the years. That said, what did Bresson see in that moment that motivated him to pick up that camera at that moment and press the shutter. In his own words he never saw the man leaping, so was it reflection that caught his eye of the background and the water or was it something else?

References

Moma.org, Henri-Cartier Bresson [online]. Available at: https://www.moma.org/collection/works/98333 [Accessed 05 July 2020]

You Tube.com, Henri-Cartier Bresson – Just Plain Love [online]. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYYwqo8HKbw [Accessed 05 July 2020]

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Exercise 5.2: Homage

The Brief

Select an image by any photographer of your choice and take a photograph in response to it. You can respond in any way you like to the whole image or to just a part of it, but you must make explicit in your notes what it is that you’re responding to. Is it a stylistic device such as John Davies’ high viewpoint, or Chris Steele Perkins’ juxtapositions? Is it an idea, such as the decisive moment? Is it an approach, such as intention – creating a fully authored image rather than discovering the world through the viewfinder?

Add the original photograph together with your response to your learning log. Which of the three types of information discussed by Barrett provides the context in this case? Take your time over writing your response because you’ll submit the relevant part of your learning log as part of Assignment Five.

A photograph inspired by another is called ‘homage’ (pronounced the French or English way). This is not the same as Picasso’s famous statement that ‘good artists borrow, great artists steal’; the point of the homage must be apparent within the photograph. It’s also not the same as ‘appropriation’ which re-contextualises its subject to create something new, often in an ironic or humorous way. Instead, the homage should share some deep empathy or kinship with the original work. An example is Victor Burgin’s series The Office at Night (1986), based on Edward Hopper’s famous painting of the same name:

‘The hackneyed idea of ‘influence’ is not at issue here. I am not interested in the question of what one artist may or may not have taken from another. I am referring to the universally familiar phenomenon of looking at one image and having another image spontaneously come to mind.’

www.tate.org.uk/research/publications/tate-papers/separateness-things-victor-burgin [accessed 25/01/18]

You may already have taken some homage photography where you’ve not tried to hide the original inspiration but rather celebrated it. Refer back to your personal archive and add one or two to your learning log together with a short caption to provide a context for the shot.

Response

I have chosen Michael Weseleys, series “Still Lives” which were a series of photographs taken for his book published in 2007 representing a series of long exposures, each taken between a few hours to over the course of a week to illustrate the life cycle of cut flowers. Weseley is known for building his own cameras, utilising a combination of small diaphragms and neutral filters to achieve the desire result. I have long been a fan of long exposure photography, but it was not until I started this course that I became aware of his works. I realised at this point that I had only just started to scratch the creative surface of what I could do with my camera. Photographs like these often leave me with the question “How did he they do that?”. The context to me is clear it is a life cycle from bloom to decay, it reminds me of nature programs where you see time sped up so that changes in season or environment become instantly observable and it is quite beautiful to see this captured in one long exposure. Below is one of Weseleys’ images taken from “Still Lives”:

I had come across Weseleys work earlier in the course and when I first saw these flowers, I thought I have to try this. The idea came to mind from my experiments with multiple exposures in exercise 3.2 Trace, where I had taken multiple exposures of my hand and knitted them together. The image I have chosen to use in response is in the style of Weseleys’ work, though taken from a technically different standpoint using multiple exposures. I do not have the equipment yet to fully explore longer exposures, so I had to improvise and opt for a slightly different approach. In this instance I took a vase of Daffodils and placed them in our conservatory where the light was good and setup the camera on a tripod. Over a period of about a week I took a series of exposures showing the different points of the life cycle of the flower. I would later knit these together in lightroom to produce the result you see below:

  • Aperture: ƒ/3.5
  • Camera: Canon EOS Kiss X4
  • Taken: 2 April, 2020
  • Focal length: 18mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/50s

I do look forward to purchasing a power source for the camera that will allow to explore long exposure photography further in the future.

References

Bird in Flight, time shows ultra long exposure in works of Michael Weseley, [online]. Available at: https://birdinflight.com/inspiration/experience/time-shows-ultra-long-exposure-in-works-of-michael-wesely.html [Accessed 03 July 2020]

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Exercise 5.1: The distance between us

The Brief

Use your camera as a measuring device. This doesn’t refer to the distance scale on the focus ring. Rather, find a subject that you have an empathy with and take a sequence of shots to ‘explore the distance between you’. Add the sequence to your learning log, indicating which is your ‘select’ – your best shot.

When you review the set to decide upon a ‘select’, don’t evaluate the shots just according to the idea you had when you took the photographs; instead evaluate it by what you discover within the frame (you’ve already done this in Exercise 1.4). In other words, be open to the unexpected. In conversation with the author, the photographer Alexia Clorinda expressed this idea in the following way:

Look critically at the work you did by including what you didn’t mean to do. Include the mistake, or your unconscious, or whatever you want to call it, and analyse it not from the point of view of your intention, but because it is there.

Response

This was an easy response in that I knew straight away it would be Tigers, predominantly those I have been going to see for a few years or so at our local wildlife park. I could sit for hours and just watch them laze and play, but on this particular day I’d spent about half an hour watching and photographing them. I was using my Canon 6D MK2 along with a Sigma 150-600mm lens, due to the distance between the viewing platform and the subject. Unfortunately I did not have my tripod with me so all of the shots were handheld, albeit using the barrier on the platform to stabilise my grip. This explains the visible blur in some of the frames and the lack of tack sharpness in the rest. Below are the contact sheets for the series of shots taken:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The shot I decided upon for my final select is the one you see below and the first thing I notice is the background albeit it faint reminds me of the fence that exists at the rear of the preserve, the image itself is not the sharpest and I only have to look at the eyes to realise this. You will also notice a patch of green above the tigers left eye. Despite all that it still remains one of my favourite shots. He is looking at something to my right (lunch maybe), but I am wondering what thoughts are running through his head.

  • Aperture: ƒ/6.3
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 12 July, 2019
  • Focal length: 600mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/80s

This was the final shot after cropping and editing, which I display at home:

  • Aperture: ƒ/6.3
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 12 July, 2019
  • Focal length: 600mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/80s
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and so it begins….part 5

The last four months have been a bit of a rollercoaster and at one point I even questioned why I was doing this. Thankfully I pressed on and now I am on to part five. Having a first read through the whole unit last night, I already have some ideas as to how I want to proceed and ultimately what I want to do for my last assignment “Photography is Simple”.

Reflecting on what I have done so far and If I could go back and give myself some advice, it would be just do it, go with your gut and if its not right don’t worry about it. I think I spent so much time on this first unit worrying about whether this is right or that is right, that I just plain forgot to relax and let my imagination do the talking and trust that voice inside you a little more. I would also say, do a little and often, try different approaches, do a little reading here and there, make scribbles, doodles, take notes, notes, notes and in one or two books not five.

If this lockdown has taught me anything it is that I should just get and make the most of the time I do have. It has been the most debilitating thing to have your freedom stripped to the point that you could not go out and do what you love for the fear of breaking the rules.

 

so here we go….

 

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Exercise 4.2 Artificial Light

The Brief

Capture ‘the beauty of artificial light’ in a short sequence of shots (‘beauty’ is, of course, a subjective term). The correct white balance setting will be important; this can get tricky – but interesting – if there are mixed light sources of different colour temperatures in the same shot. You can shoot indoors or outside and the light can be ambient or handheld flash.

Add the sequence to your learning log. In your notes try to describe the difference in the quality of light from the daylight shots in Exercise 4.1.

Response

In the first two shots I have chosen the light sources are solar powered LED lights, they are clearly decorative and provide very little illumination.

  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 3 May, 2020
  • Focal length: 105mm
  • ISO: 12800
  • Shutter speed: 1/8s

 

  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 3 May, 2020
  • Focal length: 105mm
  • ISO: 12800
  • Shutter speed: 1/8s

In this third shot the light serves to inform and nothing more and provides much less illumination than the first two shots.

  • Aperture: ƒ/22
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 29 February, 2020
  • Focal length: 28mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 30s

In this fourth shot the light from the screen provides a back light to display the necessary information for the user to interact with the computer.

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 29 February, 2020
  • Focal length: 24mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/3s

In these last two shots I have chosen light sources that provide safety and security enabling the user to move about and interact in a dark environment.

  • Aperture: ƒ/22
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 29 February, 2020
  • Focal length: 28mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 2.5s

 

The quality of light provided in these shots vary incredibly between one another more as function of their intended use than anything else. Artificial light can be informative, functional, decorative and provide illumination in dark spaces, yet be barely noticeable in the daytime. It is a much lower quality of light compared to that of daylight. That said in some circumstances it can be controlled and designed for many purposes and can be reliable in controlling the amount of light falling on a subject such as studio lighting for example.

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 29 February, 2020
  • Focal length: 24mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/3s
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Research – Studio Lighting Project

As part of my feedback from Assignment 2 (collecting) we had a discussion about my choice of camera setup and some of the constraints I had put somewhat unnecessarily on myself in working through the technical aspects. From this I was sent a link to explore some studio lighting techniques discovered by another student in her research and then from there I found an internet archive where I came across the book, which I have since  ordered “50 Lighting Setups for Portrait Photographers by Steven H. Begleiter”. Whilst I do not have the array of lighting equipment displayed in this book, I was able to experiment with four lighting setups and two soft boxes in our kitchen. Normally I don’t go for studio lighting of any kind but hindsight from my second assignment and my upcoming assignment four warranted further attention. all of the images taken were shot in manual mode. My wife Debra kindly volunteered to be my model for this experiment.

I have decided to experiment with these four lighting setups (illustrations taking from the book for reference):

 

 

 

 

Side Lighting

These two images involved the use of one soft box positioned to the left of the frame in line with the targets face against and black background. Both images seem to show effective use of side lighting subjects.

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 16 May, 2020
  • Focal length: 70mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/6s

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 16 May, 2020
  • Focal length: 70mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/6s

Paramount Lighting

These two images I have selected involved a soft box angled down towards the subject, the idea is to create a shadow below the jaw line. Out of the two I do believe the second one works better in terms of illustrating that concept.

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 16 May, 2020
  • Focal length: 70mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/6s

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 16 May, 2020
  • Focal length: 70mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/6s

Rembrandt Lighting

Similar to Paramount lighting, Rembrandt has the soft box positioned to one side of the camera approximately 2 feet above, angled and pointing towards the subject. In this instance the light is coming from the right side of my position. Both images work well here.

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 16 May, 2020
  • Focal length: 70mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/6s

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 16 May, 2020
  • Focal length: 70mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/6s

Side Lighting Modified

This method makes use of two soft boxes positioned either side of the subject at eye level and whilst both images work well I do find the lighting to be a little harsh. Perhaps in this instance the soft boxes were positioned to close to the subject.

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 16 May, 2020
  • Focal length: 70mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/6s

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 16 May, 2020
  • Focal length: 70mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/6s

Contact Sheet

References

Karen Skelhorn, Studio Lighting. [online]. Available at: https://karenskelhornoca.blogspot.com/2013/03/people-and-place-studio-lighting.html [Accessed 12th May 2020]

Archive.org, 50 Lighting Setups for Portrait Photographers. [online]. Available at: https://ia801808.us.archive.org/1/items/50_Lighting_Setups_for_Portrait_Photographers_Easy-to-Follow_Lighting_Designs_an/50_Lighting_Setups_for_Portrait_Photographers_Easy-to-Follow_Lighting_Designs_and_Diagrams.pdf [Accessed 13th May 2020]

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Image Distress

Of late I have become aware of some limitations in the functionality of the site involving the images I had been uploading. I was not very happy with the look and feel especially since I could not view the images as I had originally intended. So today I spent a little time looking at some options for viewing full size images and being able to control which images I wanted to view full size in each post. There is already some functionality there but It was not obvious to the user that they could click to enlarge the image. After a very brief search on the internet I came across a recommendation for a very simple plugin “WP Featherlight”, a very simple jQuery lightbox that changed the point to a zoom pointer, a little more obvious for the user to click on the image to view it in all its glory.

Below is a sample image taken from my old neglected Flickr account:

  • Taken: 8 May, 2020
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Exercise 4.1 Daylight

The Brief

Taking the photography of Mann, Atget or Schmidt or a photographer of your own choosing as your starting point, shoot a number of photographs exploring the quality of natural light. The exercise should be done in manual mode and the important thing is to observe the light, not just photograph it. In your learning log, and using the descriptions above as your starting point, try to describe the quality of the light in your photographs in own words.

Response

In looking at Sally Manns work on Southern Landscapes I was filled with a sense of eerie familiarity in the way she used light to convey the image. The landscapes gave way to memories of fishing trips with my father and some of the scenes often seen in black and white horror films. Two images in particular were quite striking to me:

The first thing I was drawn to when looking at this image was the small upright trunk centre left of the image, which at first glance reminded me of the scene in “The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe” where the little girl finds the street lamp in the forest. The scene below is quite mystical with the light seeps through the forest to create this scene.

The second of Manns images that grabbed my attention is this one below, for me the light takes centre stage, where the landscape for me plays a supporting role by shaping its effect on the landscape, the light brings the energy to this image.

We are currently in lockdown, so I have used the walk around a village to take some shots and on this particular day we had hazy sunshine and this image serves as a great example of the way the light permeates the image below. The light is quite harsh, especially when you look to the background and the foliage towards the back of the tree shown in the image below. Look at the background the light fades the detail on the tops of the tree line in the distance, with only the shaded areas at the bottom of the treeline showing any real definition. The tree in the foreground doesn’t escape the saturation of light, when you look at the foliage towards the back of the tree, much of the detail is lost as compared with the more shaded part in the foreground.

  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 10 April, 2020
  • Focal length: 35mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/800s

In this example below, you see the light source is coming from the right of the frame, casting a shadow from the trees and cars on the right. The light is so harsh it mutes the detail in the tops of the trees on the right side and on the top of the building in the distance. The light finds a way to breach the trees on the right to bounce light of the trees seen from the centre to the left of the frame creating depth and shadow in the branches and foliage.

  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 10 April, 2020
  • Focal length: 35mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/800s

The last image I have chosen is this shot of the blossoms from one the trees I passed shooting focused in the blossom in the foreground and on a cloudy day the background would be a little more defined. The harsh light from the sun has pierced the canopy of the tree creating a  sensation of a lot of fairy lights blurred in the background of the shot around the blossoms in the foreground.

  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Taken: 10 April, 2020
  • Focal length: 35mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/800s

References

Sally Mann, Southern Landscapes. [online]. https://www.sallymann.com/new-gallery-2/ [Accessed 28th April 2020]

 

 

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Thoughts and Reflection

10th February 2020

I have setup this page today as a diary of sorts to record anything outside of my formal work to do with this course. I may use this to document ideas that I want explore further, which may be documented  as part of an exercise, assignment or separate body of work. So we’ll see how it goes.

 

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